Botanical Ninja goes Bogging

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This past summer, I spent a good 7 days in Massachusetts. Part of that was for the NECPS Show which was probably the nicest display of specimen Carnivorous Plants I’ve ever seen. If you missed that blog post, check it out by clicking here!

After spending a relaxing weekend at the NECPS show, it was time for business!

BOGGING!

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We got to this first site early in the morning, it was so cold that heat was rising from this small pond.

Bogging was exciting and terrifying at the same time for me, almost like a love hate relationship. I’ve been a city kid my whole life, essentially living in a concrete jungle. Insects are not a prominent feature in San Diego like they are in some other cities and states, so I’m not used to the concept of being around many bugs.

My dream, and I’m sure many plant growers dreams, is to go to forests and jungles etc. and see the plants we grow in situ, but part of going to these places is seeing and potential contact with insects – my biggest fear.

Perfect spider web that was out like a net ready to catch bugs.
Perfect spider web that was out like a net ready to catch bugs.

Having a phobia of insects and arachnids is a real struggle, it’s not an, “Ew gross bugs,” it is a very real, very irrational fear. True fear. Nothing in the world really scares me except for bugs. And although it does hold me back sometimes, I didn’t want it to hold me back from doing things I really want to do in life.

This past summer was a real first step in very very slowly overcoming my phobia. My good friend Johnny was taking me out bogging to many different sites around Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

We set off early in the morning, before the sun came up. It was cold and foggy at the first site, we were in search of Drosera filiformis.

Unfortunately, it was September in Massachusetts (which means plants are getting ready for dormancy) AND the state was in a drought. So plants were already gearing down and going to sleep.

We found a handful of D. intermedia that were barely awake
We found a handful of D. intermedia that were barely awake

We found a single, very weak looking D. filiformis (likely the last there to go dormant), but it was a beautiful site.

The single puny Drosera filiformis
The single puny Drosera filiformis

This site was previously a commercial cranberry excavation site but was no longer in use for that. It currently looks like a scenic walking trail.

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As the first site, finding a handful of plants that were about to go dormant was a little bit discouraging, I was hoping I wasn’t too late to see carnivorous plants in situ. On the bright side, I love nature in general, so I saw a lot of cool lichens and fungi and other sorts of plants.

Unidentified mushroom, if there's any mycologists out there feel free to throw out an ID.
Unidentified mushroom, if there’s any mycologists out there feel free to throw out an ID.
I really liked this mushroom, we don't get much cool fungi out in San Diego, so it was really exciting to see some in MA
I really liked this mushroom, we don’t get much cool fungi out in San Diego, so it was really exciting to see some in MA
Lichens!
Lichens!
A fallen bird nest I found on our way out, I would definitely use the lichens as cushion if I were a bird
A fallen bird nest I found on our way out, I would definitely use the lichens as cushion if I were a bird

This really was a gorgeous site, next time I go to Massachusetts I’m hoping the plants aren’t dormant! Thankfully, we had a little more luck over at the next site.

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Check out all the photos in the gallery below!

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